KIMONO

Kimono
Kimono

Kimono is a Japanese traditional garment. The word “Kimono” literally means a “things to wear”. Kimono are T-shaped, straight-lined robes worn so that the hem falls to the ankle, with attached collars and long, wind sleeves. Kimono are wrapped around the body, always with the left side over the right (except when dressing the dead for burial) and secured by a sash called an obi, which is tied at the back. Kimono are generally worn with traditional footwear (especially zori or geta) and split-tor socks (tabi).

Today, kimono are most often worn by women, and on special occasions. Traditionally, unmarried women wore a style of kimono called furisode, with almost floor-length sleeves, on special occasions. A few older women and even fewer men still wear the kimono on a daily basis. Men wear the kimono most often at weddings, tea ceremonies, and other very special or very formal occasions. Professional sumo wrestlers are often seen in the kimono because they are required to wear traditional Japanese dress whenever appearing in public.

A women’s kimono way easily exceed US$10,000, a complete kimono outfit, with kimono , undergarments, obi, ties, socks, sandals, and accessories, can exceed US$20,000. A single obi may cost several thousand dollars. However, most kimonos owned by kimono hobbyists or by practitioners of traditional arts are far less expensive. Enterprising people make their own kimono and undergarments by following a standard pattern, or by recycling older kimonos.

Tabi-and-Zori
Tabi and Zori

Cheaper and machine-made fabrics can substitute for the traditional hand-dyed silk. There is also a thriving business in Japan for second-hand kimonos, which can cost as little as US$6. Women’s obi, however, mostly remain and expensive item.

Although simple patterned or plain colored ones can cost as little as US$18, even a used obi can cost hundreds of dollars, and experienced craftsmanship is required to make them. Kimonos range from extremely formal to casual. The level of formality of women’s kimono is determined mostly by the pattern of the fabric, and color.

Many modern Japanese women lack the skill to put on a kimono unaided: the typical woman’s kimono outfit consists of twelve or more separate pieces that are worn, matched, and secured in prescribed ways, and the assistance of licensed professional kimono dressers may be required. Called upon mostly for special occasion, kimono dressers both work out of hair salons and make house calls.

Women’s style of kimono

“Furisode”

Furisode

Furisode literally translated as swinging sleeves, the sleeves of furisode average between 39 and 42 inches (110 cm) in length. Furisode are the most formal kimono for unmarried women, with colourful patterns that cover the entire garment. They are usually worn at coming-of-age ceremonies and by unmarried female relatives of the bride at weddings and wedding receptions.

“Homongi”

Homongi literally translates as visiting wear. Characterized by patterns that flow over the shoulders, seams and sleeves, Homongi rank slightly higher than their close relative, the tsukesage. Homongi may be worn by both married and unmarried women; often friends of the bride will wear homongi at weddings and receptions. They may also be worn to formal parties.

“Iromuji”

Obi
Iromuju & Obi

Single colored kimono that may be worn by married and unmarried women. They are mainly worn to tea ceremonies. The dyed silk may be figured, but has no differently colored patterns. It comes from the word “muji” which means plain or solid and “iro” which means color.

“Komon”

Komon are “Fine pattern”, Kimono with a small repeated pattern throughout the garment. This style is more casual and may be worn around town, or dressed up with a formal obi for a restaurant. Both married and unmarried women may wear komon.

“Edo komon”

Edo Komon is a style of komon characterized by tiny dots arranges in dense patterns that form larger designs. The Edo komon dyeing technique originated with the samurai class during the Edo period. A kimono with this type of pattern is of the same formality as an iromuji.

“Irotomesode”

Irotomesode is single-colour kimono, patterned only below the waistline. Irotomesode with five family crests are the same as formal as kurotomesode, and are worn by married and unmarried women, usually close relatives of the bride and groom at weddings and a medal ceremony at the royal court. An Irotomesode may have three or one kamon=family crests. Those use as a semi-formal kimono at a party and conferment.

“Kurotomesode”

Kurotomesode is a black kimono patterned only below the waistline, kurotomesode are the most formal kimono for married women. They are often worn by the mothers of the bride and groom at weddings. Kurotomesode usually have five kamon-prints on the sleeves, chest and back of the kimono.

“Tsukesage”

Tsukesage has more modest patterns that cover a smaller area-mainly below the waist, than the more formal homongi. They may also be worn by married women. The differences from homongi is the size of the pattern, seam connection, and not same clothes at inside and outside at “hake”. As demi toilet, not used in important occasion, but light patterned homongi is more highly rated than classic patterned tsukesage. General Tsukesage is often used for parties, not ceremonies.

“Uchikake”

Uchikake
Uchikake

Uchikake is a highly formal kimono worn only by a bride or at a stage performance. The Uchikake is often heavily brocaded and is supposed to be worn outside the actual kimono and obi, as a sort of coat. One therefore never ties the obi around the uchikake. It is supposed to trail along the floor, this is also why it is heavily padded along the hem. The uchikake of the bridal costume is either white or very colorful often with red as the base colour.

“Susohiki” ” Hikizuri”

The susohiki is usually worn by geisha or by stage performers of the traditional Japanese dance. It is quite long, compared to regular kimono, because the skirt is supposed to trail along the floor. Susohiki literally means “trail the skirt”. Where a normal kimono for women is normally 1.5–1.6m (4.9–5.2ft.) long, a susohiki can be up to 2m (6.6ft.) long. This is also why geisha and maiko lift their kimono skirt when walking outside, also to show their beautiful under kimono or “nagajuban”.

 

“PLANNING A TRIP TO JAPAN?”

Don’t just plan a trip. Plan a life changing, luxurious adventure. Luxury Travel Japan presents a variety of proposals to meet your various needs and provides the very best Japan holiday for you. Luxury means different things to different people. It could be a hotel room, a fine restaurant, shopping, personal interests, precious experiences, or even something intangible. Please let us know your top trip priorities and apply for your free initial itinerary proposal. Made exactly as you like it, naturally.

We have a prepared a host of suggested itineraries for your consideration and inspiration, but all trips can be modified to best suit your needs.

 

東京
Tokyo

6 Days and 5 Nights

京都 Kyoto, Nara and Kobe

6 Days and 5 Nights

広島Western Honshu

14 Days and 13 Nights

近畿 Central & Western Honshu

12 Days and 11 Nights

東北 Discover Tohoku Region

6 Days and 5 Nights

四国
Shikoku

お遍路さんsize14 Days

九州
Kyushu

11 Days and 10 Nights

沖縄
Okinawa

7 Days and 6 Nights

雪国
Snow Experience

10 Days and 9 Nights

箱根
Hakone

2 Days and 1 night

鎌倉
Kamakura

Day Trip

高尾山
Mt. Takao

Day Trip

日光
Nikko

Day Trip

富士山
Mt. Fuji

2 Days and 1 Night


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